Campaign success - teaching about the UN to continue

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UNA-UK has submitted a further response to the UK Department for Education's consultation on reforming the National Curriculum, and followed it up with a letter from Sir Jeremy Greenstock, UNA-UK's Chairman, to the Education Secretary. The letter urges the government to retain teaching about the UN in the citizenship curriculum.

The Association was pleased that following the April consultation round, references to human rights and international law were re-inserted into the programme. However, we were dismayed that references to the UN - which are present in the current citizenship curriculum - continue to be absent from the proposed new programme, due to take effect in September 2014.

Learning about the UN is integral to understanding the UK’s relations with the world. The organisation is a key contributor to the country's international influence, and an effective tool for addressing global challenges. UN initiatives, from trade agreements to combating terrorism, have an impact on the country and its citizens, as do the UN human rights treaties which the UK has chosen to ratify.

It is also an important institution for young people to learn about in the context of the major challenges their generation will face, like environmental degradation and migration. For many pupils, this may be the only opportunity to study current affairs and the role of the international community.

The Association will continue to make representations on this issue, in partnership with the Association for Citizenship Teaching, and hopes that teaching about the UN will continue under the new curriculum.

Click here to read Sir Jeremy Greenstock's letter to the Education Secretary

Click here to read UNA-UK's August 2013 submission to the National Curriculum review

Click here to read about UNA-UK's previous work in this area

- See more at: http://una.org.uk/news/13/08/una-uk-calls-teaching-about-un-be-retained#sthash.eBzHRmqd.dpuf

UNA-UK has submitted a further response to the UK Department for Education's consultation on reforming the National Curriculum, and followed it up with a letter from Sir Jeremy Greenstock, UNA-UK's Chairman, to the Education Secretary. The letter urges the government to retain teaching about the UN in the citizenship curriculum.

The Association was pleased that following the April consultation round, references to human rights and international law were re-inserted into the programme. However, we were dismayed that references to the UN - which are present in the current citizenship curriculum - continue to be absent from the proposed new programme, due to take effect in September 2014.

Learning about the UN is integral to understanding the UK’s relations with the world. The organisation is a key contributor to the country's international influence, and an effective tool for addressing global challenges. UN initiatives, from trade agreements to combating terrorism, have an impact on the country and its citizens, as do the UN human rights treaties which the UK has chosen to ratify.

It is also an important institution for young people to learn about in the context of the major challenges their generation will face, like environmental degradation and migration. For many pupils, this may be the only opportunity to study current affairs and the role of the international community.

The Association will continue to make representations on this issue, in partnership with the Association for Citizenship Teaching, and hopes that teaching about the UN will continue under the new curriculum.

Click here to read Sir Jeremy Greenstock's letter to the Education Secretary

Click here to read UNA-UK's August 2013 submission to the National Curriculum review

Click here to read about UNA-UK's previous work in this area

- See more at: http://una.org.uk/news/13/08/una-uk-calls-teaching-about-un-be-retained#sthash.eBzHRmqd.dpuf

UNA-UK has submitted a further response to the UK Department for Education's consultation on reforming the National Curriculum, and followed it up with a letter from Sir Jeremy Greenstock, UNA-UK's Chairman, to the Education Secretary. The letter urges the government to retain teaching about the UN in the citizenship curriculum.

The Association was pleased that following the April consultation round, references to human rights and international law were re-inserted into the programme. However, we were dismayed that references to the UN - which are present in the current citizenship curriculum - continue to be absent from the proposed new programme, due to take effect in September 2014.

Learning about the UN is integral to understanding the UK’s relations with the world. The organisation is a key contributor to the country's international influence, and an effective tool for addressing global challenges. UN initiatives, from trade agreements to combating terrorism, have an impact on the country and its citizens, as do the UN human rights treaties which the UK has chosen to ratify.

It is also an important institution for young people to learn about in the context of the major challenges their generation will face, like environmental degradation and migration. For many pupils, this may be the only opportunity to study current affairs and the role of the international community.

The Association will continue to make representations on this issue, in partnership with the Association for Citizenship Teaching, and hopes that teaching about the UN will continue under the new curriculum.

Click here to read Sir Jeremy Greenstock's letter to the Education Secretary

Click here to read UNA-UK's August 2013 submission to the National Curriculum review

Click here to read about UNA-UK's previous work in this area

- See more at: http://una.org.uk/news/13/08/una-uk-calls-teaching-about-un-be-retained#sthash.eBzHRmqd.dpuf

UNA-UK has submitted a further response to the UK Department for Education's consultation on reforming the National Curriculum, and followed it up with a letter from Sir Jeremy Greenstock, UNA-UK's Chairman, to the Education Secretary. The letter urges the government to retain teaching about the UN in the citizenship curriculum.

The Association was pleased that following the April consultation round, references to human rights and international law were re-inserted into the programme. However, we were dismayed that references to the UN - which are present in the current citizenship curriculum - continue to be absent from the proposed new programme, due to take effect in September 2014.

Learning about the UN is integral to understanding the UK’s relations with the world. The organisation is a key contributor to the country's international influence, and an effective tool for addressing global challenges. UN initiatives, from trade agreements to combating terrorism, have an impact on the country and its citizens, as do the UN human rights treaties which the UK has chosen to ratify.

It is also an important institution for young people to learn about in the context of the major challenges their generation will face, like environmental degradation and migration. For many pupils, this may be the only opportunity to study current affairs and the role of the international community.

The Association will continue to make representations on this issue, in partnership with the Association for Citizenship Teaching, and hopes that teaching about the UN will continue under the new curriculum.

Click here to read Sir Jeremy Greenstock's letter to the Education Secretary

Click here to read UNA-UK's August 2013 submission to the National Curriculum review

Click here to read about UNA-UK's previous work in this area

- See more at: http://una.org.uk/news/13/08/una-uk-calls-teaching-about-un-be-retained#sthash.eBzHRmqd.dpuf

UNA-UK is delighted to report that its campaign to retain teaching about the UN under the National Curriculum has been successful.

The publication of the new curriculum for England and Wales, due to take effect in September 2014, marks the end of a long-running campaign for the Association. Along with members of the Democratic Life coalition, UNA-UK first lobbied for Citizenship to remain a foundation subject for Key Stages 3 and 4.

Once this had been achieved, UNA-UK turned its attention to the content of the proposed programmes of study, calling for them to include explicit references to the UN, human rights and international law, and to promote a broad view of what it means to be an active and responsible local, national and global citizen.

The campaign involved a wide range of partners, including the Association of Citizenship Teaching, the UN All-Party Parliamentary Group and UNA Youth. All expressed pleasure at the strengthened programmes of study unveiled yesterday.

Natalie Samarasinghe, UNA-UK's Executive Director, said: "Learning about the UN is integral to understanding the UK's relations with the rest of the world, including on complex issues such as the crisis in Syria. We firmly believe that this decision will enrich young people's knowledge of global affairs and enhance their ability to tackle the challenges their generation will face."

To aid teaching about the UN, UNA-UK has produced a raft of resources in collaboration with UNESCO Associated Schools UK. These were recently featured on the Guardian Teachers Network as "an invaluable guide" for teachers wishing to introduce their students to the United Nations and international diplomacy.

For more information on these resources, or to request hard copies, please contact Natalie Saad on saad@una.org.uk

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